2014 Faculty [Program]   
 
The 2014 NS Mycological Society Foray currently has the following esteemed faculty attending:
 
Dr. David Malloch, Keynote Speaker
  TrufflesMaster's degree from San Francisco State University, Ph.D. from the University of Toronto.  First professional job was with Agriculture Canada in Ottawa in 1970.  In 1975 accepted a faculty position in the Department of Botany, University of Toronto.  Taught a two-week course in marine biology at the Huntsman Marine Science Centre, St. Andrews, New Brunswick from 1986 to 2006 and developed a strong attachment to Atlantic Canada.  Retired in 2003 and moved to Little Lepreau, New Brunswick.  Research Associate with the New Brunswick Museum from 2003 to present.

Dr Malloch's Keynote Address will be on:

Cortinarius
Cortinarius is the largest genus of mushrooms, thought to as many as 2000 species worlwide.  Two thousand species is probably an underestimate; according to Funga Nordica, there are estimated to be 900 species in the nordic countries alone.  Since species of Cortinarius are found from the tropics to the arctic and subantarctic the actual number of species may be several thousand.  All species of Cortinarius are thought to be mycorrhizal; that is, they form very specific symbiotic relationships with the roots of woody plants.  These relationships are specific enough that species found associated with oak will not usually be found under pine.  Such specific associations partially explain the great diversity within the genus.

Identification of Cortinarius species is difficult.  Authors of most field guides limit themselves to describing only a few common and distinctive species.  Trying to name collections not in these guides is a frustrating task requiring a lot of books, a microscope, and a great deal of perserverance.  Most amateur mycologists just throw up their hands and go on to less challenging groups.  However, the genus can be subdivided into smaller more workable groups, allowing us to narrow the task down somewhat.  There are now some excellent guides to European species of Cortinarius that work pretty well in North America and at least some groups are under study here.

    Truffles
Dr. Leanord Hutchison, Keynote Speaker
 

Leanord is an associate professor in the Faculty of Natural Resources Management at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario. He teaches courses in Fungal Biology, Forest Pathology, Plant Biology and Urban Forestry. His research is focussed on the biology of forest fungi, including mushrooms that form ectomycorrhizas and those that decompose wood and litter.

Dr Hutchison's keynote address will be on: Life Underground: The Story of Truffles and Truffle-like Fungi.

   
Dr. David Boyle
David has been interested in mushrooms for a long time. He started and ran Maritime MicroBiologicals Inc. (MMBI), this company doing R&D, primarily for industry.  Fungi that increased plant growth (e.g. mycorrhizal fungi), degraded pollutants (bioremediation) or controlled insect pests (biological control) figured in varoius projects. MMBI also sold spawn for various edible mushrooms to commercial growers.  David continues to make spawn and give workshops on growing mushrooms during his retirement.
 
Amanda Bremnar
  Mycology expert from the New Brunswick Museum, also returning from the 2010 Foray
 
Dr. Scott Cunningham
  Scott is a biologist with a doctorate in molecular biology,and sea kayaker who has explored the Atlantic coast by canoe and sea kayak for over two decades. In 1982 he established Coastal Adventures,and outdoor adventure and kayaking company. He has written of his experiences extensively in articles for outdoor magazines and has published Sea Kayaking in Nova Scotia,a detailed route guide (revised in 2000). He has photographed our coastline extensively and his work has appeared in several magazines and books depicting the region. Scott is an avid naturalist and co-founder of the Halifax Field Naturalists. His specialty is the mushroom flora of the region.
   
Dr. Gavin Kernaghan
  Gavin is Associate Professor at Mount Saint Vincent Univeristy. He leads the Atlantic Root Symbiosis Lab,where research focuses on the ecology of fungi in northern forests. In particular the ecological relationships between plant communities and their root associated endophytic and mycorrhizal fungi. The lab combines mycorrhizal re-synthesis with a variety of DNA based identification techniques. Gavin is a director of the NS Mycological society and leads the mushroom identification and voucher specimen program for the Nova Scotia forays.